Uci Electrical Engineering Research Papers

Gregory Washington, Dean

Gregory Washington, Dean
5200 Engineering Hall
Undergraduate Counseling: 949-824-4334
Graduate Counseling: 949-824-8090
http://www.eng.uci.edu/

Overview

The academic mission of The Henry Samueli School of Engineering has been developed to be consistent with the missions and goals set for it by the State of California, the University of California, and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) campus. Specifically, the academic mission of the School is to educate students, at all levels, to be the best engineers and leaders in the nation and world by engaging them in a stimulating community dedicated to the discovery of knowledge, creation of new technologies, and service to society.

The individual engineering and related programs have published program objectives that are consistent with the missions and goals of the University of California, UCI, and The Henry Samueli School of Engineering.

The School offers undergraduate majors in Aerospace Engineering (AE), Biomedical Engineering (BME), Biomedical Engineering: Premedical (BMEP), Chemical Engineering (ChE), Civil Engineering (CE), Computer Engineering (CpE), Computer Science and Engineering (CSE, a jointly administered program with the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences), Electrical Engineering (EE), Engineering (a general program, GE), Environmental Engineering (EnE), Materials Science Engineering (MSE), and Mechanical Engineering (ME). The undergraduate majors in Aerospace, Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Computer, Computer Science and Engineering, Electrical, Environmental, Materials Science, and Mechanical Engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org; Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) is also accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org. The undergraduate major in Biomedical Engineering: Premedical (BMEP) is not designed to be accredited, therefore is not accredited by ABET.

Aerospace Engineering considers the flight characteristics, performance, and design of aircraft and spacecraft. An upper-division series of courses in aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and control follows a common core with Mechanical Engineering. The skills acquired in those courses are integrated in the capstone aerospace design course. The intent of the program is to produce highly proficient engineers who can tackle the aerospace engineering challenges of the future. 

Biomedical Engineering applies engineering principles to solve complex medical problems and focuses at improving the quality of health care by advancing technology and reducing costs. Examples include advanced biomedical imaging systems, the design of microscale diagnostic systems, drug delivery systems, and tissue engineering. Specializations are available that focus student’s technical expertise on biophotonics or biomems. 

Biomedical Engineering:Premedical shares introductory engineering courses with Biomedical Engineering, but replaces senior engineering laboratories and design courses with biology and organic chemistry courses required by medical schools for admission. The intent of the program is to produce students with a basic engineering background who are qualified to enter medical school. 

Chemical Engineering applies the knowledge of chemistry, mathematics, physics, biology, and humanities to solve societal problems in areas such as energy, health, the environment, food, textiles, shelter, semiconductors, and homeland security. Employment opportunities exist in various industries such as chemical, petroleum, polymer, pharmaceutical, food, textile, fuel, consumer products, and semiconductor, as well as in local, state, and federal governments.  

Civil Engineering addresses the challenges of large-scale engineering projects of importance to society as a whole, such as water distribution, transportation, and building design. Specializations are provided in General Civil Engineering, Environmental Hydrology and Water Resources, Structural Engineering, and Transportation Systems Engineering. 

Computer Engineering addresses the design and analysis of digital computers, including both software and hardware. Computer design includes topics such as computer architecture, VLSI circuits, data base, software engineering, design automation, system software, and data structures and algorithms. Courses include programming in high-level languages such as Python, Java, C, C++; use of software packages for analysis and design; design of system software such as operating systems and hardware/software interfaces; application of computers in solving engineering problems, and laboratories in both hardware and software experiences. 

Computer Science and Engineering is designed to provide students with the fundamentals of computer science, both hardware and software, and the application of engineering concepts, techniques, and methods to both computer systems engineering and software system design. The program gives students access to multidisciplinary problems in engineering with a focus on total systems engineering. Students learn the computer science principles that are critical to development of software, hardware, and networking of computer systems. From that background, engineering concepts and methods are added to give students exposure to circuit design, network design, and digital signal processing. Elements of engineering practice include systems view, manufacturing and economic issues, and multidisciplinary engineering applications. The program is administered jointly by the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering and by the Department of Computer Science in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences. 

Electrical Engineering is one of the major contributors to the modernization of our society. Many of the most basic and pervasive products and services are either based on or related to the scientific and engineering principles taught at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Students specialize in Electronic Circuit Design; Semiconductors and Optoelectronics; RF, Antennas and Microwaves; Digital Signal Processing; or Communications. 

The major in Engineering is a special program of study for upper-division students who wish to combine the study of engineering principles with other areas such as the physical and biological sciences, social and behavioral science, humanities, and arts. Students may construct their own specialization. Click on the "Undergraduate Study" tab above for information about this major.

Environmental Engineering concerns the development of strategies to control and minimize pollutant emissions, to treat waste, and to remediate polluted natural systems. Emphasis areas include air quality and combustion, water quality, and water resources engineering. 

Materials Science Engineering is concerned with the generation and application of knowledge relating the composition, structure, and synthesis of materials to their properties and applications. During the past two decades, Materials Science Engineering has become an indispensable component of modern engineering education, partly because of the crucial role materials play in national defense, the quality of life, and the economic security and competitiveness of the nation; and partly because the selection of materials has increasingly become an integral part of almost every modern engineering design. Emphasis in the Materials Science Engineering curriculum is placed on the synthesis, characterization, and properties of advanced functional materials; analysis, selection, and design related to the use of materials; the application of computers to materials problems; and the presence of an interdisciplinary theme that allows a qualified student to combine any engineering major with the Materials Science Engineering major. 

Mechanical Engineering considers the design, control, and motive power of fluid, thermal, and mechanical systems ranging from microelectronics to spacecraft to the human body. Specializations allow students to focus their technical electives in the areas of Aerospace Engineering, Energy Systems and Environmental Engineering, Flow Physics and Propulsion Systems, and Design of Mechanical Systems. 

The School offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Biomedical Engineering; Chemical and Biochemical Engineering; Civil Engineering; Electrical and Computer Engineering, with concentrations in Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering; Engineering, with concentrations in Environmental Engineering, and Materials and Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Specialized research opportunities are available within each of these programs. In Biomedical Engineering, areas of research include micro/nanoscale biomedical devices for diagnostics and therapeutics, biophotonics, systems/synthetic bioengineering, tissue/organ engineering, cardiovascular engineering, cancer biotechnology, and neuroengineering. Bioreaction and bioreactor engineering, recombinant cell technology, and bioseparation processes are research areas in Biochemical Engineering. In Civil Engineering, research opportunities are provided in structural/earthquake engineering, reliability engineering, transportation systems engineering, environmental engineering, and water resources. Research opportunities in Electrical and Computer Engineering are available in the areas of parallel and distributed computer systems, VLSI design, computer architecture, image and signal processing, communications, control systems, and optical and solid-state devices. Research in combustion and propulsion sciences, laser diagnostics, supersonic flow, direct numerical simulation, computer-aided design, robotics, control theory, parameter identification, material processing, electron microscopy, and ceramic engineering are all available in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. The School also offers the M.S. degree in Engineering Management, a joint degree program with the Paul Merage School of Business; and the M.S. degree in Biotechnology Management, a joint degree program with the Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences and The Paul Merage School of Business.

Additional publications describing undergraduate and graduate academic study and research opportunities are available through The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, and the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

Degrees

Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree

All students in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering must fulfill the following requirements.

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements:

The following are minimum subject-matter requirements for graduation:

Mathematics and Basic Science Courses: Students must complete a minimum of 48 units of college-level mathematics and basic sciences.

Engineering Topics Courses: Students must complete a minimum of 72 units of engineering topics. Engineering topics are defined as courses with applied content relevant to the field of engineering.

Design Units: All undergraduate Engineering courses indicate both a total and a design unit value. Design unit values are listed at the end of the course description. Each student is responsible for the inclusion of courses whose design units total that required by the program of study.

The Academic Plan and Advising Requirements to remain affiliated with The Henry Samueli School of Engineering: All students enrolled in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering are required to meet annually with their designated faculty for advising and mentoring and to have an academic plan on file with the Student Affairs Office which has been approved by their academic counselor. Students who do not have a plan on file, or deviate from this plan without approval from an academic counselor will be subject to probation. Students on probation for two consecutive quarters who do not have a plan on file, or deviate from this plan without approval from an academic counselor will be subject to disqualification. Students who fail to meet with a faculty advisor each year will be subject to disqualification.

Duplication of Subject Material: Students who take courses which involve considerable duplication of subject material may not receive full graduation credit for all units thus completed.

Residence Requirement: In addition to the University residence requirement, at least 36 upper-division engineering units specified by each major must be completed successfully at the University of California.

Variations: Variations from the general School degree requirements may be made subject to the approval of the faculty of the School. Students wishing to obtain variances should submit petitions to the School’s Student Affairs Office.

Undergraduate Study

John LaRue,Associate Dean for Undergraduate Student Affairs
Student Affairs Office
305 Rockwell Engineering Center
949-824-4334

Planning a Program of Study

Advising

Academic advising is available from academic counselors and peer advisors in the School’s Student Affairs Office, 305 Rockwell Engineering Center, and from faculty advisors. Students must realize, however, that ultimately they alone are responsible for the planning of their own program and for satisfactory completion of the graduation requirements. Students are encouraged to consult with the academic counselors in the Engineering Student Affairs Office whenever they desire to change their program of study. All Engineering majors are required to meet with their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Some engineering students will need more than four years to obtain their B.S., particularly if part-time employment or extracurricular activities make heavy demands on their time. Normally, such students can stay on track, and are encouraged to do so, by enrolling in summer sessions at UCI or at other institutions when a petition has been approved in advance.

High-achieving students may declare a second major. Early consultation with the School is advisable.

Required courses may be replaced by other courses of equivalent content if the student substantiates the merits of the courses in the program of study and obtains prior approval from faculty in the School.

Students should be aware that most Engineering courses require the completion of prerequisites. The sample programs shown in each departmental description constitute preferred sequences which take into account all prerequisites.

School policy does not permit the deletion of Engineering courses after the second week or addition of Engineering courses after the second week of the quarter without the Associate Dean’s approval.

Undergraduate students who have high academic standing, who have completed the necessary prerequisites, and who have obtained permission from the School may qualify to take certain graduate-level courses.

Students are required to complete UCI’s lower-division writing requirement (see the Requirements for a Bachelor’s Degree section) during the first two years. Thereafter, proficiency in writing and computing (using a higher-level language such as Python, C, C++, Java, or MATLAB) is expected in all Engineering courses.

The Pass/Not Pass option is available to encourage students to enroll in courses outside their major field. Pass/Not Pass option cannot be used to satisfy specific course requirements of the students school and major. Students must take courses to fulfill the UC Entry Level Writing requirement for a grade. For more complete information, see the Academic Regulations and Procedures section of this Catalogue.

Admissions

The sequential nature of the Engineering program and the fact that many courses are offered only once a year make it beneficial for students to begin their studies in the fall quarter. Applicants wishing to be admitted for the fall quarter, 2018, must have submitted their completed application forms during the priority filing period (August 1 - November 30, 2017).

High school students wishing to enter the UCI Engineering program must have completed four years of mathematics through pre-calculus or math analysis and are advised to have completed one year each of physics and chemistry. That preparation, along with honors courses and advanced placement courses, is fundamental to success in the Engineering program and is vital to receiving first consideration for admittance to an Engineering major during periods of restricted enrollments. Students applying for admission for fall quarter should complete their examination requirements during May or June of their junior year or during their senior year, but no later than the December test date. (Typically, this means that students will take the SAT or the ACT Plus Writing Test in October or November. Applicants are strongly encouraged to take a math or science AP or SAT exam. Applicants should favor the Math Level 2 SAT Subject Test over the Math Level 1 Test. Applicants must apply for admission to a specific Engineering major or Engineering Undeclared.

If enrollment limitations make it necessary, unaccommodated Engineering applicants may be offered alternative majors at UCI.

Transfer students may be admitted to The Henry Samueli School of Engineering either from another major at UCI or from another college or university. A student seeking admission to The Henry Samueli School of Engineering from colleges and schools other than UCI must satisfy University requirements for admission with advanced standing and should complete appropriate prerequisites for their major of choice. Applicants should prioritize completing subject requirements (math, science, engineering) over completion of IGETC or UCI general education and lower-division requirements prior to transfer. IGETC is not considered in transfer selection while subject requirements contribute directly to reducing time to graduate. Since requirements vary from major to major, those contemplating admission with advanced standing to the School should consult each Department’s Catalogue section and the UCI Office of Admissions and Relations with Schools, 949-824-6703, for the specific requirements of each program. All transfer students should arrange for early consultation with The Henry Samueli School of Engineering Student Affairs Office at 949-824-4334.

Change of Major: Students who wish to change their major to one offered by the School should contact the Engineering Student Affairs Office for information about change-of-major requirements, procedures, and policies. Information is also available at the UCI Change of Major Criteria website.

Proficiency Examinations

A student may take a course by examination with the approval of the faculty member in charge of the course and the Dean of the School. Normally, ability will be demonstrated by a written or oral examination; if a portion of the capability involves laboratory exercises, the student may be required to perform experiments as well. The proficiency examination is not available for any course a student has completed at UCI.

Concentration: Engineering and Computer Science in the Global Context

The globalization of the marketplace for information technology services and products makes it likely that The Henry Samueli School of Engineering graduates will work in multicultural settings or be employed by companies with extensive international operations, or customer bases. The goal of the concentration is to help students develop and integrate knowledge of the history, language, and culture of a country or geographic region outside the United States, through course work both at UCI and an international host campus, followed by a technology-related internship in the host country.

All of The Henry Samueli School of Engineering majors in good standing may propose an academic plan that demonstrates the ability to complete the concentration (a minimum of eight courses) and other requirements for graduation in a reasonable time frame. It is expected that a student’s proposal will reflect a high degree of planning that includes the guidance of academic counselors and those at the UCI Study Abroad Center regarding course selection, as well as considerations related to internship opportunities, housing, and financial aid. Each student’s proposed program of study must be approved by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering. The Associate Dean will be available to assist qualified students with the development of a satisfactory academic plan, as needed.

The concentration consists of the following components:

  1. A minimum of eight courses at UCI or at the international campus with an emphasis on the culture, language (if applicable and necessary), history, literature of the country that corresponds to the international portion of the program, international law, international labor policy, global issues, global institutions, global conflict and negotiation, and global economics;
  2. A one- or two-semester sequence of technical courses related to the major and, possibly, culture, history, and literature courses taken at an international university;
  3. A two-month or longer technical internship experience in the same country as the international educational experience.

More information about the requirements for the concentration is available in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering Student Affairs Office.

The concentration in Engineering and Computer Science in the Global Context is open to students in Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering: Premedical, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Engineering (General), Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Materials Science Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.

Engineering Gateway Freshman-Year Curriculum

Students who know that they want to major in engineering but who are unsure of the specific major should apply for the Engineering Gateway Curriculum and follow the Sample Engineering Gateway Curriculum. Students following the Engineering Gateway Curriculum are required to meet with an academic advisor every quarter and are strongly encouraged to declare a major as soon as possible and then follow the appropriate sample program of study for that major.

Sample Engineering Gateway Curriculum - Freshman1

Students who choose certain majors during the first year may replace Chemistry courses with required major courses.

Students should choose a major by the end of the spring quarter of their freshman year or earlier. Some modification in the program of study might be appropriate if the student chooses a major before the end of the freshman year. In any case, when the major is chosen, the student must meet immediately with an academic counselor to plan the program of study.

Undergraduate Programs

Specific information about courses fulfilling School and major requirements can be found in the department sections. Note that some majors require more units than the School requirements.

Aerospace Engineering
Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering: Premedical
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Engineering
Environmental Engineering
Materials Science Engineering
Mechanical Engineering

Minors of Interest to Engineers

Minor in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

The minor in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences focuses on the application of physical, chemical, and biological principles to understanding the complex interactions of the atmosphere, ocean, and land through climate and biogeochemical cycles. See the Department of Earth System Science in the School of Physical Sciences section of this Catalogue for more information.

Minor in Global Sustainability

The interdisciplinary minor in Global Sustainability trains students to understand the changes that need to be made in order for the human population to live in a sustainable relationship with the resources available on this planet. See the Interdisciplinary Studies section of this Catalogue for more information.

Career Advising

The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. See the Career Center section for additional information. In addition, special career planning events are held throughout the year including an annual Career Fair. Individual career counseling is available, and students have access to the Career Library which contains information on graduate and professional schools in engineering, as well as general career information.

Honors

Graduation with Honors. Undergraduate honors at graduation in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering are computed by using 50 percent of the overall UCI GPA and 50 percent of the upper-division Engineering GPA. (Engineering E190 is not used in the calculation of the upper-division GPA.) A general criterion is that students must have completed at least 72 units in residence at a University of California campus. Approximately 2 percent of the graduating class shall be awarded summa cum laude, 4 percent magna cum laude, and 10 percent cum laude, with no more than 16 percent being awarded honors. Other important factors are considered visit at  Honors Recognition.

Dean’s Honor List. The quarterly Dean’s Honor List is composed of students who have received a 3.5 GPA while carrying a minimum of 12 graded units.

Gregory Bogaczyk Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Gregory Bogaczyk, a former UCI Mechanical Engineering student, and is contributed by the Bogaczyk family and friends. An award is given each year to a junior or senior Mechanical Engineering student.

Haggai Memorial Endowed Scholarship. This memorial fund was established in honor of Ted Haggai, an electrical engineer. This scholarship is awarded to an outstanding senior electrical engineering student and member of Tau Beta Pi. Primary consideration will be given to members of Tau Beta Pi who have contributed outstanding service to both UCI and The Henry Samueli School of Engineering.

Christine Jones Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Christine Jones, an Electrical Engineering graduate, Class of 1989. The primary focus of this scholarship is to provide financial support to a female undergraduate student in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering.

Deborah and Peter Pardoen Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded each year to a graduating senior in Mechanical Engineering or in Aerospace Engineering. The scholarship is based on outstanding service to The Henry Samueli School of Engineering and the community.

Henry Samueli Endowed Scholarship. This premier scholarship, established by Henry Samueli, is awarded to outstanding freshmen and transfer students in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering. Recipients are chosen by the School based on their academic excellence. The award is renewable up to four years for freshmen and up to two years for transfer students.

Additional awards in other categories are made throughout the academic year.

Office of Access and Inclusion

200A Rockwell Engineering Center; 949-824-7134
Sharnnia Artis, Assistant Dean for Access and Inclusion

The Office of Access and Inclusion (OAI) facilitates and supports the recruitment, retention, and graduation of undergraduate and graduate students from historically excluded populations who are currently underrepresented in the Samueli School of Engineering and the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences. Services include mentoring, tutoring, career and academic workshops and coaching, and assistance for students looking to conduct undergraduate research or prepare for graduate school. 

Special Programs and Courses

Campuswide Honors Program

The Campuswide Honors Program is available to selected high-achieving students from all academic majors from their freshman through senior years. For more information contact the Campus­wide Honors Program, 1200 Student Services II; 949-824-5461; honors@uci.edu; or visit the Campuswide Honors Program website.

Engineering 199

Every undergraduate student in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering has the opportunity to pursue independent research under the direct supervision of a professor in the School. Interested students should consult with a faculty member to discuss the proposed research project. If the project is agreed upon, the student must fill out a 199 Proposal Form and submit it to the Engineering Student Affairs Office.

Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program

The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) encourages and facilitates research and creative activities by undergraduates. Research opportunities are available not only from every discipline, interdisciplinary program, and school, but also from many outside agencies, including national laboratories, industrial partners, and other universities. UROP offers assistance to students and faculty through all phases of the research activity: proposal writing, developing research plans, resource support, conducting the research and analyzing data, and presenting results of the research at the annual spring UCI Undergraduate Research Symposium. Calls for proposals are issued in the fall and spring quarters. Projects supported by UROP may be done at any time during the academic year and/or summer, and the research performed must meet established academic standards and emphasize interaction between the student and the faculty supervisor. In addition, all students participating in faculty-guided research activities are welcome to submit their research papers for faculty review and possible publication in the annual UCI Undergraduate Research Journal. For more information, contact the UROP Office, 1100 Student Services II; 949-824-4189; urop@uci.edu; or visit the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program website.

Accelerated M.S. or Ph.D. Status Program in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering

Exceptionally promising UCI undergraduate Engineering students may, during their junior or senior year, petition for streamlined admissions into a graduate program within The Henry Samueli School of Engineering. Accelerated M.S. Status would allow a student to petition for exemption from UCI’s Graduate Record Examination (GRE) requirement for graduate school admission. (The exemption applies only to current UCI students applying for admission to one of the M.S. programs in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering; other graduate schools may still require the GRE.) A current UCI undergraduate student whose ultimate goal is a Ph.D. may apply for Accelerated Status, however, a GRE score must be submitted.

Accelerated Status applicants would in all other ways be evaluated in the same manner as other applicants to the School’s graduate programs. Occasionally, a candidate for Accelerated Status may be required by the faculty to submit GRE scores in support of the graduate application.

Students who successfully petition for Accelerated Status, upon matriculation to the graduate degree program, may petition to credit toward the M.S. degree up to 18 units (with a grade of B or better) of graduate-level course work completed in excess of requirements for the UCI bachelor’s degree.

Visit the UCI Undergraduate Accelerated Status website for more detailed information about this program and its eligibility requirements.

UC Education Abroad Program

Engineering students may participate in a number of programs which offer unique opportunities for education and training abroad. The University’s Education Abroad Program (UCEAP) offers engineering course work for UCI academic credit at a number of universities. Some of the UCEAP-affiliated engineering schools require proficiency in the host country’s language, while others are English speaking. Study abroad may postpone the student’s graduation for one or two quarters, depending primarily on the student’s language preparation (which can begin in the freshman year), but the added experience can add to the student’s maturity and professional competence. UCEAP students pay regular UCI fees and tuition and keep any scholarships they may have. Visit the Study Abroad Center website for additional information.

Student Participation and Organizations

Faculty and committee meetings (except those involving personnel considerations) are open meetings; in addition to designated student representatives, all students are encouraged and expected to participate in the development of School policy. Student evaluation of the quality of instruction for each course is requested each quarter.

Engineering students may join any of a number of student organizations. Most of these organizations are professionally oriented and in many instances are local chapters of national engineering societies. A primary function of these groups is to provide regular technical and social meetings for students with common interests. Most of the groups also participate in the annual Engineering Week activities and in other School functions.

Associated General Contractors (AGC). A student chapter of the national organization, ACG at UCI is an academic engineering club for students interested in the construction field.

American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES). The mission of AISES is to increase the representation of American Indians in engineering, science, and technology. Chapters emphasize education as a tool that will facilitate personal and professional growth opportunities through mentor programs, leadership training, scholarships, conferences, and summer job opportunities.

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA).The AIAA is a technical society of 40,000 professional and student members devoted to science and engineering in the field of aero­space. The local chapter’s primary activities include seminars, tours of industries, and mentoring for students by professional members.

American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). AIChE, a student chapter of the national organization, provides Chemical Engineering majors with the opportunity to interact with faculty and professionals in the field.

American Society for Civil Engineers (ASCE). One of the larger engineering clubs, ASCE at UCI is a student chapter of the national organization. The ASCE focuses its efforts on interactions with professional engineers, sponsorship of Engineering Week activities, and participation in the annual ASCE Southwest Conference.

American Society for Materials (ASM). The student chapter of ASM at UCI provides the opportunity for Materials Science Engineering (MSE) students to meet engineers and scientists from local industry, attend seminars organized by the Orange Coast Chapter of ASM International, and organize discussion sessions that focus on progress and advances in the MSE field and that promote interactions between MSE students and materials faculty.

American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). The student chapter of ASME at UCI provides the opportunity for Mechanical Engineering majors to meet with professors, organize social events, and participate in events and competitions supported by the ASME national organization.

Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). The student chapter of BMES at UCI is an academic club for students in the field of Biomedical Engineering.

Chi Epsilon. This organization is a national engineering honor society which is dedicated to the purpose of promoting and maintaining the status of civil engineering as an ideal profession. Chi Epsilon was organized to recognize the characteristics of the individual that are fundamental to the successful pursuit of an engineering career.

Electric Vehicle Association/UCI (EVA/UCI). EVA/UCI gives students an opportunity for hands-on work on electric car conversions coupled with design experience.

Engineering Student Council (ESC). The ESC is the umbrella organization that provides a voice for all Engineering student chapters. A significant activity of the Council is organizing UCI’s annual Engineering Week celebration.

Engineers Without Borders (EWB). This humanitarian organization combines travel with the idea that engineers can play an instrumental role in addressing the world’s assorted challenges. Through the implementation of equitable, economical, and sustainable engineering projects, EWB-UCI works to improve quality of life within developing communities abroad.

Eta Kappa Nu. A student chapter of the National Electrical Engineering Honor Society, Eta Kappa Nu’s purpose is to promote creative interaction between electrical engineers and give them the opportunity to express themselves uniquely and innovatively to project the profession in the best possible manner.

Filipinos Unifying Student-Engineers in an Organized Network (FUSION). Fusion is the merging of diverse, distinct, or separate elements into a unified whole. The mission of FUSION is to promote the academic and professional development of student engineers by providing an organized network of support.

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). A student chapter of a multinational organization, IEEE at UCI encompasses academic, professional, and social activities.

Instituteof TransportationEngineers (ITE). ITE is a student chapter of a national group of transportation engineering professionals. Offering opportunities to meet both professionals and other students, ITE focuses its activities on an annual project with practical applications.

Mexican-American Engineers and Scientists (MAES) / Latinos in Science and Engineering. Open to all students, MAES is a student and professional organization with the purpose of aiding students in their academic, professional, and social endeavors.

National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). The NSBE, with almost 6,000 members, is one of the largest student-managed organizations in the country. The Society is dedicated to the realization of a better tomorrow through the development of intensive programs to increase the recruitment, retention, and successful graduation of underrepresented students in engineering and other technical majors.

Omega Chi Epsilon. The student chapter of the National Chemical Engineering Honor Society aims to recognize and promote high scholarship, original investigation, and professional service in chemical engineering.

Phi Sigma Rho. This national sorority is open to women in engineering, engineering technology, and STEM majors. Its purpose is to provide social opportunities, promote academic excellence, and provide encouragement and friendship.

Pi Tau Sigma. The mechanical engineering honor society, Pi Tau Sigma, is committed to recognizing those of high achievement. The goal of the organization is to promote excellence in academic, professional, and social activities.

Sigma Gamma Tau. The aerospace engineering honor society, Sigma Gamma Tau, is committed to recognizing those of high achievement. The goal of the organization is to promote excellence in academic, professional, and social activities.

Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE). SHPE is both a student and professional organization. The UCI SHPE chapter works to recruit, retain, and graduate Latino engineers by providing a comprehensive program which includes high school visitations, coordinated study sessions, and industry speakers and tours. At the professional level there are opportunities for career positions and scholarships for members who are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate engineering and computer science programs.

Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). Members of the SAE chapter at UCI participate in technical expositions, mini-Baja buggy races, student competitions, and social activities.

Society of Women Engineers (SWE). SWE is a national service organization dedicated to the advancement of women in engineering. UCI’s student chapter encourages academic and social support, and membership is open to both men and women in technical majors interested in promoting camaraderie and in helping to make engineering study a positive experience.

Structural Engineers Association of Southern California (SEAOSC). The UCI student chapter of SEAOSC introduces students to the field of structural engineering through tours, speakers, and SEAOSC dinners with professional members of the organization.

Sustainable Energy Technology Club (SETC). With the common theme of energy, club members explore how science and technology can be used as a driving force behind making changes in society with respect to a cleaner environment and less wasteful lifestyles.

Tau Beta Pi. The national Engineering honor society, Tau Beta Pi acknowledges academic excellence in the wide variety of engineering disciplines. Tau Beta Pi at UCI sponsors community service activities, social events, and technical and nontechnical seminars.

Theta Tau. This is a national fraternity of men and women studying engineering. The goals are to promote the social and professional development of its members during and after their college years.

Triangle. This national social fraternity is open to men majoring in engineering, architecture, and the physical, mathematical, biological, and computer sciences. Its purpose is to develop balanced men who cultivate high moral character, foster lifelong friendships, and live their lives with integrity.

Schoolwide Program

Faculty in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering also teach courses in the major in Engineering program.

Descriptions and requirements for the undergraduate majors in Aerospace Engineering (AE), Biomedical Engineering (BME), Biomedical Engineering: Premedical (BMEP), Chemical Engineering (ChE), Civil Engineering (CE), Computer Engineering (CpE), Computer Science and Engineering (CSE), Electrical Engineering (EE), Engineering (a general program, GE), Environmental Engineering (EnE), Materials Science Engineering (MSE), and Mechanical Engineering (ME) may be found in subsequent sections.

General Undergraduate Major in Engineering

305 Rockwell Engineering Center; 949-824-4334

The Henry Samueli School of Engineering offers a general undergraduate major in Engineering to upper-division students who wish to pursue broad multidisciplinary programs of study or who wish to focus on a special area not offered in the four departments. Examples of other areas that may be of interest are biochemical engineering, electromechanical engineering, project management, or hydrology. The program of study in any area, aside from the established specializations, is determined in consultation with a faculty advisor.

Admissions

The general major in Engineering is only open to junior-standing students who have completed the required lower-division courses with a high level of achievement. Freshmen are not eligible to apply for this major. The sequential nature of the Engineering program and the fact that many courses are offered only once a year make it beneficial for students to begin their studies in the fall quarter.

Transfer Students: The general Engineering major is a specialized program for students who are seeking careers in areas other than traditional engineering disciplines and is open to upper-division students only. Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: one year of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), one course in computational methods (e.g., C, C++), and one year of general chemistry (with laboratory).

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division coursework may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at 949-824-4334.

Requirements for the B.S. in Engineering

Credit for at least 180 units, and no more than 196 units. All courses must be approved by a faculty advisor and the Associate Dean of Student Affairs prior to enrollment in the program.

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Major Requirements

Mathematics and Basic Science Courses:MATH 2A-MATH 2B-MATH 2D, MATH 2E, MATH 3A, and MATH 3D. PHYSICS 7C, PHYSICS 7LC, PHYSICS 7D, and PHYSICS 7LD. With the approval of a faculty advisor and the Associate Dean, students select all additional Mathematics and Basic Science courses.

Engineering Topics Courses:ENGRMAE 10 or equivalent. With the approval of a faculty advisor and the Associate Dean, students select all additional Engineering Topics courses.

Design unit values are indicated at the end of each course description. The faculty advisors and the Student Affairs Office can provide necessary guidance for satisfying the design requirements.

Program of Study

Students should keep in mind that the program for the major in Engineering is based upon a rigid set of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Therefore, the course sequence should not be changed except for the most compelling reasons. Students must have their programs approved by an academic counselor in Engineering. A sample program of study is available in the Student Affairs Office.

Graduate Study

Fadi J. Kurdahi, Associate Dean for Graduate and Professional Studies
Graduate Student Affairs Office
204 Rockwell Engineering Center
949-824-8090

Admissions

For information on requirements for admission to graduate study at UCI, contact the appropriate Engineering department, concentration director, or the Graduate Student Affairs Office in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering. Additional information is available in the Catalogue’sGraduate Division section. Admission to graduate standing in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering is generally accorded to those possessing a B.S. in engineering or an allied field obtained with an acceptable level of scholarship from an institution of recognized standing. Those seeking admission without the prerequisite scholarship record may, in some cases, undertake remedial work; if completed at the stipulated academic level, they will be considered for admission. Those admitted from an allied field may be required to take supplementary upper-division courses in basic engineering subjects. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test is required of all applicants.

Financial Support

Teaching assistantships and fellowships are available to qualified applicants. (Applicants should contact the Department or concentration director to which they are applying for information.) Research assistantships are available through individual faculty members. Although not required, it is beneficial for applicants to contact the faculty member directly to establish the potential for research support. Early applications have a stronger chance for financial support.

Part-Time Study

Those students who are employed may pursue the M.S. on a part-time basis, carrying fewer units per quarter. Since University residency requirements necessitate the successful completion of a minimum number of units in graduate or upper-division work in each of at least three regular University quarters, part-time students should seek the advice of a counselor in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering Graduate Student Affairs Office and the approval of the Graduate Advisor in their program. M.S. programs must be completed in four calendar years from the date of admission. Students taking courses in UCI Division of Continuing Education prior to enrollment in a graduate program should consult the following section on Transfer of Courses.

Transfer and Substitution of Courses

Upon petition, a limited number of upper-division undergraduate or graduate-level courses taken through UCI Division of Continuing Education, at another UC campus, or in another accredited university may be credited toward the M.S. after admission. The applicability of transfer or substitution courses must be approved by the student’s department, the School’s Associate Dean, and the Graduate Dean of the University, in accordance with Academic Senate regulations. Also in accordance with UC Academic Senate policy, transfer credit for the M.S. cannot be used to reduce the minimum requirement in strictly graduate (200 series) courses.

Graduate Specialization in Teaching

The graduate specialization in Teaching will allow Engineering Ph.D. students to receive practical training in pedagogy designed to enhance their knowledge and skill set for future teaching careers. Students will gain knowledge and background in college-level teaching and learning from a variety of sources, and experience in instructional practices. Students completing the specialization in Teaching must fulfill all of their Ph.D. requirements in addition to the specialization requirements. Upon fulfillment of the requirements, students will be provided with a certificate of completion. Upon receipt of the certificate of completion, the students can then append "Specialization in Teaching" to their curricula vitae. For details visit the Graduate Specialization in Teaching website.

The graduate specialization in Teaching is available only for certain degree programs and concentrations:

  • Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering
  • Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Ph.D. in Engineering with a concentration in Materials and Manufacturing Technology 

Graduate Programs

For specific information about program requirements, click on the links below.

Biomedical Engineering
Biotechnology Management
Chemical and Biochemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering (Concentration in Computer Engineering)
Electrical and Computer Engineering (Concentration in Electrical Engineering)
Engineering (Concentration in Environmental Engineering)
Engineering (Concentration in Materials and Manufacturing Technology)
Engineering Management
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

The M.S. and Ph.D. program in Networked Systems is supervised by an interdepartmental faculty group. Information is available in the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

M.S. and Ph.D. in Engineering with a Concentration in Materials and Manufacturing Technology

204 Rockwell Engineering Center; 949-824-8090
http://engineering.uci.edu/interdisciplinary-graduate-programs/materials-and-manufacturing-technology 
Chin C. Lee, Director and Graduate Advisor

Materials and Manufacturing Technology (MMT) is concerned with the generation and application of knowledge relating the composition, structure, and processing of materials to their properties and applications, as well as the manufacturing technologies needed for production. During the past two decades, MMT has become an important component of modern engineering education, partly because of the increased level of sophistication required of engineering materials in a rapidly changing technological society, and partly because the selection of materials has increasingly become an integral part of almost every modern engineering design. In fact, further improvements in design are now viewed more and more as primarily materials and manufacturing issues. Both the development of new materials and the understanding of present-day materials demand a thorough knowledge of basic engineering and scientific principles including, for example, crystal structure, mechanics, mechanical behavior, electronic, optical and magnetic properties, thermodynamics, phase equilibria, heat transfer, diffusion, and the physics and chemistry of solids and chemical reactions.

The field of MMT ranks high on the list of top careers for scientists and engineers. The services of these engineers and scientists are required in a variety of engineering operations dealing, for example, with design of semiconductors and optoelectronic devices, development of new technologies based on composites and high-temperature materials, biomedical products, performance (quality, reliability, safety, energy efficiency) in automobile and aircraft components, improvement in nondestructive testing techniques, corrosion behavior in refineries, radiation damage in nuclear power plants, fabrication of steels, and construction of highways and bridges.

Subjects of interest in Materials and Manufacturing Technology cover a wide spectrum, ranging from metals, optical and electronic materials to superconductive materials, ceramics, advanced composites, and biomaterials. In addition, the emerging new research and technological areas in materials are in many cases interdisciplinary. Accordingly, the principal objective of the graduate curriculum is to integrate a student’s area of emphasis—whether it be chemical processing and production, electronic and photonic materials and devices, electronic manufacturing and packaging, or materials engineering—into the whole of materials and manufacturing technology. Such integration will increase familiarity with other disciplines and provide students with the breadth they need to face the challenges of current and future technology.

Students with a bachelor’s degree may pursue either the M.S. or Ph.D. in Engineering with a concentration in Materials and Manufacturing Technology (MMT). If students choose to enter the Ph.D. program directly, it is a requirement that they earn an M.S. along the way toward the completion of their Ph.D.

Recommended Background

Given the nature of Materials and Manufacturing Technology as an interdisciplinary program, students having a background and suitable training in either Materials, Engineering (Biomedical, Civil, Chemical, Electrical, and Mechanical), or the Physical Sciences (Physics, Chemistry, Geology) are encouraged to participate. Recommended background courses include an introduction to materials, thermodynamics, mechanical properties, and electrical/optical/magnetic properties. A student with an insufficient background may be required to take remedial undergraduate courses following matriculation as a graduate student.

Core Requirement

Because of the interdepartmental nature of the concentration, it is important to establish a common foundation in Materials and Manufacturing Technology (MMT) for students from various backgrounds. This foundation is sufficiently covered in MMT courses that are listed below and that deal with the following topics: ENGRMSE 200 Crystalline Solids: Structure, Imperfections, and Properties; ENGRMAE 252 Fundamentals of Microfabrication or ENGR 265 Advanced Manufacturing; ENGRMAE 259 Mechanical Behavior of Solids - Atomistic Theories; BME 261 Biomedical Microdevices. Core courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better.

Electives

Electives are grouped into four areas of emphasis.

It should be noted that specific course requirements within the area of emphasis are decided based on consultation with the Director of the MMT concentration.

Master of Science Degree

Two options are available for M.S. students: a thesis option and a comprehensive examination option. Both options require the completion of at least 12 courses of study.

Plan I. Thesis Option

For the thesis option, students are required to complete an original research project and write an M.S. thesis. A committee of three full-time faculty members is appointed to guide the development of the thesis. Students must also obtain approval for a complete program of study from the program director. At least seven courses (3-unit or 4-unit) must be taken from courses numbered 200–289, among which at least four courses (3-unit or 4-unit) are from MMT core courses and at least three courses (3-unit or 4-unit) are in the area of emphasis approved by the faculty advisor and the graduate advisor. Four units of BME 296, CBEMS 296, EECS 296, ENGR 296, ENGRCEE 296, or ENGRMAE 296 count as the equivalence of one course. Up to three courses equivalent of BME 296, CBEMS 296, EECS 296, ENGR 296, ENGRCEE 296, or ENGRMAE 296 and up to two courses (3-unit or 4-unit) of upper-division undergraduate elective courses taken as a graduate student at UCI can be applied toward the 12-course requirement.

Plan II. Comprehensive Examination Option

For the comprehensive examination option, students are required to complete minimally 12 courses (3-unit or 4-unit) of study. At least eight courses (3-unit or 4-unit) must be taken from courses numbered 200–289, among which at least four courses (3-unit or 4-unit) are from MMT core courses and at least four courses (3-unit or 4-unit) are in the area of emphasis approved by the faculty advisor and the graduate advisor. Four units of BME 299, CBEMS 299, EECS 299, ENGRCEE 299, or ENGRMAE 299 count as the equivalence of one course. One course equivalent of BME 299, CBEMS 299, EECS 299, ENGRCEE 299, or ENGRMAE 299 and up to two courses (3-unit or 4-unit) of upper-division undergraduate elective courses taken as a graduate student at UCI can be applied toward the 12-course requirement.

In the last quarter, an oral comprehensive examination on the contents of study will be given by a committee of three faculty members including the advisor and two members appointed by the program director. Part-time study for the M.S. is available and encouraged for engineers working in local industries. Registration for part-time study must be approved in advance by the MMT program director, the School’s Associate Dean, and the Graduate Dean.

In addition to fulfilling the course requirements outlined above, it is a University requirement for the Master of Science degree that students fulfill a minimum of 36 units of study.

Concurrent Study in the Program in Law and Graduate Studies (PLGS)

Students have the option to pursue a coordinated curriculum leading to a J.D. degree from the School of Law in conjunction with a Master's or Ph.D. in Engineering with a concentration in Materials and Manufacturing Technology. For students pursuing the M.S. thesis option, 8 units of research can be substituted for law electives, and comprehensive exam students can petition two course (non-course or area of emphasis courses) to be substituted by law electives.


Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The Ph.D. in Engineering with a concentration in Materials and Manufacturing Technology requires a commitment on the part of the student to dedicated study and collaboration with the faculty. Ph.D. students are selected on the basis of outstanding demonstrated potential and scholarship. Applicants must hold the appropriate prerequisite degrees from recognized institutions of high standing. Students entering with a master’s degree may be required to take additional course work, to be decided in consultation with the graduate advisor and the program director. Students without a master’s degree may be admitted into the Ph.D. program. However, these students will be required to complete the degree requirements above for the master’s degree prior to working on doctoral studies. After substantial academic preparation, Ph.D. candidates work under the supervision of faculty advisors. The process involves immersion in a research atmosphere and culminates in the production of original research results presented in a dissertation.

Milestones to be passed in the Ph.D. program include the following: acceptance into a research group by the faculty advisor during the student’s first year of study, successful completion of the Ph.D. preliminary examination during years one or two, development of a research proposal, passing the qualifying examination during year three (second year for those who entered with a master’s degree), and the successful completion and defense of the dissertation during the fourth or fifth year. There is no foreign language requirement.

The degree is granted upon the recommendation of the doctoral committee and the Dean of Graduate Division. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years (four years for students who entered with a master’s degree). The maximum time permitted is seven years.


M.S. in Engineering Management

204 Rockwell Engineering Center; 949-824-8090
http://www.eng.uci.edu/admissions/graduate/programs-and-concentrations/engineering-management
John C. LaRue, Associate Dean for Student Affairs, The Henry Samueli School of Engineering
Gerardo Okhuysen, Equity Advisor & Associate Dean of MBA Programs, The Paul Merage School of Business

Engineering Management Steering Committee

Imran S. Currim: Marketing research, customer choice, design and marketing of products and services, customer behavior online, and assessing the impact of competitive product and service features and marketing efforts on consumer choice and market share

Peter Burke: Nano-electronics, bio-nanotechnology 

Fadi J. Kurdahi: VLSI system design, design automation of digital systems

John C. LaRue: Fluid mechanics, micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS), turbulence, heat transfer, instrumentation

Marc J. Madou: Fundamental aspects of micro/nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), biosensors, nanofluidics, biomimetics

Gerardo Okhuysen: Management of task and environmental uncertainly

H. Kumar Wickramsinghe, Department Chair
2213 Engineering Hall
949-824-4821
http://www.eng.uci.edu/dept/eecs

Overview

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science is a broad field encompassing such diverse subject areas as computer systems, distributed computing, computer networks, control, electronics, photonics, digital systems, circuits (analog, digital, mixed-mode, and power electronics), communications, signal processing, electromagnetics, and physics of semiconductor devices. Knowledge of the mathematical and natural sciences is applied to the theory, design, and implementation of devices and systems for the benefit of society. The Department offers three undergraduate degrees: Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, as well as Computer Science and Engineering. Computer Science and Engineering is offered in conjunction with the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences; information is available in the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

Some electrical engineers focus on the study of electronic devices and circuits that are the basic building blocks of complex electronic systems. Others study power electronics and the generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy. A large group of electrical engineers studies the application of these complex systems to other areas, including medicine, biology, geology, and ecology. Still another group studies complex electronic systems such as automatic controls, tele­com­munications, wireless communications, and signal processing.

Computer engineers are trained in various fields of computer science and engineering. They engage in the design and analysis of digital computers and networks, including software and hardware. Computer design includes topics such as computer architecture, VLSI circuits, computer graphics, design automation, system software, data structures and algorithms, distributed computing, and computer networks. Computer Engineering courses include programming in high-level languages such as Python, C++ and Java; use of software packages for analysis and design; design of system software such as operating systems; design of hardware/software interfaces and embedded systems; and application of computers in solving engineering problems. Laboratories in both hardware and software experiences are integrated within the Computer Engineering curriculum.

The undergraduate curriculum in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering provides a solid foundation for future career growth, enabling graduates’ careers to grow technically, administratively, or both. Many electrical and computer engineers will begin work in a large organizational environment as members of an engineering team, obtaining career satisfaction from solving meaningful problems that contribute to the success of the organization’s overall goal. As their careers mature, technical growth most naturally results from the acquisition of an advanced degree and further development of the basic thought processes instilled in the undergraduate years. Administrative growth can result from the development of management skills on the job and/or through advanced degree programs in management.

Graduates of Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and Computer Science and Engineering will find a variety of career opportunities in areas including wireless communication, voice and video coding, biomedical electronics, circuit design, optical devices and communication, semiconductor devices and fabrication, power systems, power electronics, computer hardware and software design, computer networks, design of computer-based control systems, application software, data storage and retrieval, computer graphics, pattern recognition, computer modeling, parallel computing, and operating systems.

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Undergraduate Major in Computer Engineering

Program Educational Objectives: Graduates of the Computer Engineering program will (1) be engaged in professional practice at or beyond the entry level or enrolled in high-quality graduate programs building on a solid foundation in engineering, mathematics, the sciences, humanities and social sciences, and experimental practice as well as modern engineering methods; (2) be innovative in the design, research and implementation of systems and products with strong problem solving, communication, teamwork, leadership, and entrepreneurial skills; (3) proactively function with creativity, integrity and relevance in the ever-changing global environment by applying their fundamental knowledge and experience to solve real-world problems with an understanding of societal, economic, environmental, and ethical issues. (Program educational objectives are those aspects of engineering that help shape the curriculum; achievement of these objectives is a shared responsibility between the student and UCI.)

The undergraduate Computer Engineering curriculum includes a core of mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Engineering courses in fundamental areas fill in much of the remaining curriculum.

Admissions

High School Students: See School Admissions information.

Transfer Students: Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: one year of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), completion of lower-division writing, one course in computational methods (e.g., C, C++), and two additional approved courses for the major.

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division coursework may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at 949-824-4334.

Requirements for the B.S. in Computer Engineering

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Major Requirements:

At most an aggregate total of 6 units of EECS 199 may be used to satisfy degree requirements; EECS 199 is open to students with a 3.0 GPA or higher.

(The nominal Computer Engineering program will require 188 units of courses to satisfy all university and major requirements. Because each student comes to UCI with a different level of preparation, the actual number of units will vary.)

Planning a Program of Study

The sample program of study chart shown is typical for the major in Computer Engineering. Students should keep in mind that this program is based upon a sequence of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Students who are not adequately prepared, or who wish to make changes in the sequence for other reasons, must have their program approved by their advisor. Computer Engineering majors must consult at least once every year with the academic counselors in the Student Affairs Office and with their faculty advisor.

Sample Program of Study — Computer Engineering

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Undergraduate Major in Computer Science and Engineering (CSE)

This program is administered jointly by the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering and the Department of Computer Science in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences. For information, see the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

Requirements for the B.S. in Computer Science and Engineering

All students must meet the University Requirements.
Major Requirements: See the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

Undergraduate Major in Electrical Engineering

Program Educational Objectives: Graduates of the Electrical Engineering program will (1) engage in professional practice in academia, industry, or government; (2) promote innovation in the design, research and implementation of products and services in the field of electrical engineering through strong communication, leadership and entrepreneurial skills; (3) engage in life-long learning in the field of electrical engineering. (Program educational objectives are those aspects of engineering that help shape the curriculum; achievement of these objectives is a shared responsibility between the student and UCI.)

The undergraduate Electrical Engineering curriculum is built around a basic core of humanities, mathematics, and natural and engineering science courses. It is arranged to provide the fundamentals of synthesis and design that will enable graduates to begin careers in industry or to go on to graduate study. UCI Electrical Engineering students take courses in network analysis, electronics, electronic system design, signal processing, control systems, electromagnetics, and computer engineering. They learn to design circuits and systems to meet specific needs and to use modern computers in problem analysis and solution.

Electrical Engineering majors have the opportunity to select a specialization in Electro-optics and Solid-State Devices; and Systems and Signal Processing. In addition to the courses offered by the Department, the major program includes selected courses from the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences.

Admissions

High School Students: See School Admissions information.

Transfer Students: Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: one year of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), completion of lower-division writing, one course in computational methods (e.g., C, C++), and two additional approved courses for the major.

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division coursework may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at 949-824-4334.

Requirements for the B.S. in Electrical Engineering

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Major Requirements:

At most an aggregate total of 6 units of EECS 199 may be used to satisfy degree requirements; EECS 199 is open to students with a 3.0 GPA or higher.

(The nominal Electrical Engineering program will require 188-191 units of courses to satisfy all university and major requirements. Because each student comes to UCI with a different level of preparation, the actual number of units will vary.)

EECS 170D

Integrated Electronic Circuit Design

EECS 170E

Analog and Communications IC Design

EECS 166A

Industrial and Power Electronics

EECS 174

Semiconductor Devices

EECS 176

Fundamentals of Solid-State Electronics and Materials

EECS 179

Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)

EECS 182

Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Analysis and Design

EECS 188

Optical Electronics

EECS 174

Semiconductor Devices

EECS 188

Optical Electronics

PHYSICS 52A

Fundamentals of Experimental Physics

EECS 170D

Integrated Electronic Circuit Design

EECS 176

Fundamentals of Solid-State Electronics and Materials

EECS 179

Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)

EECS 180B

Engineering Electromagnetics II

EECS 180C

Engineering Electromagnetics III

ENGR 54

Principles of Materials Science and Engineering

EECS 144

Antenna Design for Wireless Communication Links

EECS 180B

Engineering Electromagnetics II

EECS 182

Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Analysis and Design

EECS 170D

Integrated Electronic Circuit Design

EECS 170E

Analog and Communications IC Design

EECS 180C

Engineering Electromagnetics III

EECS 188

Optical Electronics

PHYSICS 52A

Fundamentals of Experimental Physics

EECS 22

Advanced C Programming

EECS 152A

Digital Signal Processing

EECS 152B

Digital Signal Processing Design and Laboratory

EECS 20

Computer Systems and Programming in C

EECS 101

Introduction to Machine Vision

EECS 112

Organization of Digital Computers

EECS 141A

Communication Systems I

EECS 141B

Communication Systems II

EECS 141A

Communication Systems I

EECS 141B

Communication Systems II

EECS 20

Computer Systems and Programming in C

EECS 22

Advanced C Programming

EECS 144

Antenna Design for Wireless Communication Links

EECS 148

Computer Networks

EECS 152A

Digital Signal Processing

EECS 152B

Digital Signal Processing Design and Laboratory

EECS 170E

Analog and Communications IC Design

EECS 188

Optical Electronics

Program of Study

Listed below are sample programs for each of the five specializations within Electrical Engineering. These sample programs are typical for the accredited major in Electrical Engineering. Students should keep in mind that this program is based upon a rigid set of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Therefore, the course sequence should not be changed except for the most compelling reasons. Students who are not adequately prepared, or who wish to make changes in the sequence for other reasons, must have their programs approved by their advisor. Electrical Engineering majors must consult with the academic counselors in the Student Affairs Office and with their faculty advisors at least once a year.

Sample Program of Study — Electrical Engineering (Electronic Circuit Design Specialization)

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Sample Program of Study — Electrical Engineering (Semiconductors and Optoelectronics)

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Sample Program of Study — Electrical Engineering (RF, Antennas and Microwaves)

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Sample Program of Study — Electrical Engineering (Digital Signal Processing Specialization)

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